Tag Archives: Italian Renaissance

Vasari’s Lives of the Artists, BBC Radio 4 Broadcast

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00sg2y4

“Melvyn Bragg discusses ‘Lives of the Artists’ – the great biographer Giorgio Vasari’s study of Renaissance painters, sculptors and architects. In 1550 a little known Italian artist, Giorgio Vasari, published a revolutionary book entitled ‘Lives of the Most Excellent Italian Painters, Sculptors, and Architects, from Cimabue to Our Times’.” (Quote from BBC Radio 4, linked above)

HHP the Movie: Amsterdam, City of Dissent

From the Center for History of Hermetic Philosophy and Related Currents:

“Situated within the Faculty of Humanities of the University of Amsterdam, the Center for History of Hermetic Philosophy and Related Currents (HHP) is the world’s leading institute for academic research and teaching in the field of Western esotericism. We are currently the only center in the world providing a complete academic study program in the history of esotericism, from the Bachelor to the PhD level. Our international and interdisciplinary research group delivers cutting-edge research on esoteric currents from the Renaissance to contemporary times. Our students are invited to engage with ongoing research through teaching modules and tutorials in the MA program. http://www.amsterdamhermetica.nl

Renaissance Men (class): Medici studies: Medici Greek bronze undergoes restoration

“The bronze sculpture, dated from 350 BC, once graced the halls of the Renaissance-era Palazzo Medici Riccardi in central Florence, and has been described as a masterpiece of Greek classical art.
But after it slipped from the grasp of the Medici clan it began to deteriorate as it found its way into the archaeological museum in 1881 where it is now said to be in serious need to restoration.”

http://www.ansa.it/english/news/lifestyle/arts/2015/02/19/medici-bronze-being-restored-for-show_90248ae6-3416-447b-8223-55f0acfe0a89.html

Villa di carregi (Platonic Academy of the Medici)

“It was to this villa that Lorenzo brought his friends, members of the Plato Academy, and here that he spent the last years of his life, until his own death in 1492. Surviving descriptions of the garden as it was in the time of Lorenzo speak of vegetation composed of myrtles, olives, oaks, poplars, pines, plane trees, citrus trees and such exotic spices as frankincense and myrrh. The description suggests that the garden was in two parts, one for the cultivation of flowers and fruit and another ‘wilder’ part. ” — cultura.toscana.it

800px-Villa_di_careggi_01