Tag Archives: Cultural Studies (class)

Cultivating Humanity: A Classical Defense of Reform in Liberal Education (Dr. Martha C. Nussbaum)

"Drawing on Socrates and the Stoics, Nussbaum establishes three core values of liberal education–critical self-examination, the ideal of the world citizen, and the development of the narrative imagination."

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Mae Jemison: Teaching art & science together (TED talk)

“Mae Jemison is an astronaut, a doctor, an art collector, a dancer … Telling stories from her own education and from her time in space, she calls on educators to teach both the arts and sciences, both intuition and logic, [holistically] – to create bold thinkers.” (TED page)

Designing beauty

British Museum blog

Caroline Ingham, Senior Designer: Exhibitions, British Museum

Doryphoros Detail of a Bronze reconstruction of around 1920 by George Römer of the Doryphoros or ‘spear-bearer’ by Polykleitos, made around 440–430 BC. H 212 cm. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich

Defining beauty: the body in ancient Greek art is the first major temporary exhibition of sculpture at the British Museum since Hadrian: Empire & Conflict in 2008. It is also the first sculpture show in the new Sainsbury Exhibitions Gallery (Room 30). For the Museum’s Exhibitions team this is the culmination of over a year of intensive work with the exhibition’s designers, Caruso St John architects and Matt Bigg, Surface 3 graphics.

Doryphoros, Diskobolos, Ilissos2 Sculptures on display in the exhibition, from left to right: Bronze reconstruction of around 1920 by George Römer of the Doryphoros or ‘spear-bearer’ by Polykleitos, made around 440–430 BC. H 212 cm. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich. Marble statue of the Diskobolos or ‘discus-thrower’. Roman copy from 2nd…

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Vasari’s Lives of the Artists, BBC Radio 4 Broadcast

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00sg2y4

“Melvyn Bragg discusses ‘Lives of the Artists’ – the great biographer Giorgio Vasari’s study of Renaissance painters, sculptors and architects. In 1550 a little known Italian artist, Giorgio Vasari, published a revolutionary book entitled ‘Lives of the Most Excellent Italian Painters, Sculptors, and Architects, from Cimabue to Our Times’.” (Quote from BBC Radio 4, linked above)

Mathematics, Linguistics / “58 and other Confusing Numbers” – Numberphile

Copied from Numberphile’s Youtube page:

“Published on Mar 6, 2015
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Tom Scott on numbers and linguistics – a discussion with spans counties, countries, continents and the far reaches of space.
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Pi is Beautiful – Numberphile

Published on Jan 3, 2014
With thanks to Martin Krzywinski and Cristian Ilies Vasile

Intro to Cultural Studies: Digital auto-profile of musical subjectivities

Last.fm listening record:

Library, listed by frequency of play:
http://www.last.fm/user/Zedos/library

Top Tracks
http://www.last.fm/user/Zedos/charts?rangetype=overall&subtype=tracks

Top Artists:
http://www.last.fm/user/Zedos/charts?rangetype=overall&subtype=artists

Spotify listening record:

Starred Tracks:
https://play.spotify.com/user/12143648970/starred

Liked from radio:
https://play.spotify.com/user/12143648970/playlist/3lYPJ1dqBVnn7Gm0f2Pnic

Intro to Cultural Studies: Term Paper resources/art & science links testimonials (i)

“In DaVinci’s time when expertise in art and science had not yet matured to the polarized state in which they exist today, they coexisted naturally. Of course, science’s level of sophistication back then was quite different. But from where I sit as the president of the Rhode Island School of Design, it is clear to me that even current practices in scientific research have much to gain by involving artists in the process early and often. Artists serve as great partners in the communication of scientific research; moreover, they can serve as great partners in the navigation of the scientific unknown.”

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2013/07/11/artists-and-scientists-more-alike-than-different/

Intro to Cultural Studies: Contemporary Colonialism?

Noted for the use of the signifier “colony” in connection to European financial powers: “Austerity means that people is expulsed of their homes. Austerity means that the social services don’t work anymore. Austerity means that public schools have not the elements, the means to develop their activity. Austerity means that the countries have not sovereignty anymore, and we became a colony of the financial powers and a colony of Germany. Austerity probably means the end of democracy. I think if we don’t have democratic control of economy, we don’t have democracy.” (Pablo Iglesias, secretary general of Podemos, interview [43:11] with Amy Goodman on Democracy Now! Feb. 17, 2015. Emphasis mine.)

Also noted in regards to leverage gained by financial powers in framing political opposition: “…I think that this game that separate the political field, between center-left and center-right, sometimes is something very useful to make the banks win.” (ibid.,[46:31])

Video at full screen.

Video and transcript.