Cultivating Humanity: A Classical Defense of Reform in Liberal Education (Dr. Martha C. Nussbaum)

"Drawing on Socrates and the Stoics, Nussbaum establishes three core values of liberal education–critical self-examination, the ideal of the world citizen, and the development of the narrative imagination."

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Anthropologist? You’re hired!

Standplaats Wereld

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By Giulia Sinatti

The stereotypical image of anthropologists as weird people studying local customs in odd corners of the globe could not be less accurate, according to speakers at the “Why the World Needs Anthropologists – Burning Issues of Our Hot Planet” symposium held in Ljubljana (Slovenia) on Friday 27 November 2015. People trained in anthropological skills, they suggested, can play a pivotal role as the world struggles to cope with a number of burning issues of our time. Most importantly, they can play this role by understanding local communities far away as well as on their doorstep, and through work in and outside the academic Ivory Tower. Anthropologists, in short, are an urgently needed “breed” of professionals.

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USF: Master of Arts in Liberal Arts, Humanities

Possibility after graduation:

“The Master of Arts in Liberal Arts, Humanities track is an interdepartmental program that offers students an interdisciplinary approach to the study of European, American, and Latin American cultures. Classes integrate interpretations of the literature, arts, and music of each cultural period with an understanding of their social and historical contexts” /humanities.usf.edu/graduate/humanities.aspx

Emergence and Complexity [Professor Robert Sapolsky , Stanford]

“(May 21, 2010) Professor Robert Sapolsky gives a lecture on emergence and complexity. He details how a small difference at one place in nature can have a huge effect on a system as time goes on. He calls this idea fractal magnification and applies it to many different systems that exist throughout nature.” (Stanford’s Youtube channel)

Filed in connection to the Santa Fe Institute and Complexity Explorer.

Mae Jemison: Teaching art & science together (TED talk)

“Mae Jemison is an astronaut, a doctor, an art collector, a dancer … Telling stories from her own education and from her time in space, she calls on educators to teach both the arts and sciences, both intuition and logic, [holistically] – to create bold thinkers.” (TED page)

Neil deGrasse Tyson and the value of philosophy

Scientia Salon

doiusmpelstbw9isfoykby Massimo Pigliucci

It seems like my friend Neil deGrasse Tyson [1] has done it again: he has dismissed philosophy as a useless enterprise, and actually advised bright students to stay away from it. It is not the first time Neil has done this sort of thing, and he is far from being the only scientist to do so. But in his case the offense is particularly egregious, for two reasons: first, because he is a highly visible science communicator; second, because I told him not to, several times.

Let’s start with the latest episode, work our way back to a few others of the same kind (to establish that this is a pattern, not an unfortunate fluke), and then carefully tackle exactly where Neil and a number of his colleagues go wrong. But before any of that, let me try to halt the obvious objection to this entire essay…

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Academic Aspirations of Joshua Zintel